Americas

.

Benefits to elite schools and the formation of expected returns to education: Evidence from Mexico City – Estrada R and Gignoux J, 2014

Am I That Talented? The experiences of gifted individuals from diverse educational backgrounds at the postsecondary level – Gomez-Arizaga M and Conejeros-Solar M – 2013

Distance Education in Rural High Schools as a Solution to the Dropout Problem among Gifted Students – Lister, M (2013)

Puerto Rican Students’ Perspectives of Socio-Cultural Characteristics of Gftedness and Talent Development – Taylor, M, 2013

Reversing underachievement among gifted secondary students – Winton, B, 2013

Social, Genetic and Psychological Factors that Influence Musically Gifted and Musically Talented Children – Doderai M, 2013

Student and Teacher Attitudes Toward Giftedness in a Two Laboratory School Environment: A Case for Conducting a Needs Assessment: Cross J R et al (NALS Journal Volume 5 Issue 1, 2013

Teacher Perspectives Regarding Gifted Diverse Students – Szymanski T and Shaff T – 2013

Youth Leadership: A proposal for identifiying and developing creativity and giftedness – Pfeiffer S and Wechsler S, 2013

A Survey of Educational Acceleration Practices in Canada – Kanevsky L, 2011

 

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Americas

  1. What a great blog!

    Here’s an open access journal article you might want to add to your collection:
    Kanevsky, L. S. (2011) A Survey of Educational Acceleration Practices in Canada. Canadian Journal of Education, 34 (3), 153-180.
    This link should download the article:
    ojs.vre.upei.ca/index.php/cje-rce/article/download/569/1059
    I just returned the page proofs for a partner piece on acceleration policies in Canada (same journal) and will provide the link once it is available online.

    Thank you for your efforts to promote access to research in this field–

  2. Hi Lannie (I hope you don’t mind my familiarity)

    Thanks so much for taking the trouble to drop by – and for your positive feedback. It’s always pleasing when I know a ‘name’ from the field is reading what I write (I know a few are signed up for email alerts but most have been only passive consumers to date).

    I’ve included a link to your paper in the OpenGate research section of the blog and also added a brief bio under K in the Who’s Who section. (The latter mentions your new website but doesn’t link to it, given the warning notice you’ve placed there.) All the pages behind my principal blog are simultaneously works in progress and out-of-date, but every now and then I have a blitz. One day I’ll get them in the shape I want.

    It is important to me to try to push greater open access to gifted education research. I wrote a post about this issue and, in preparing for that, was suprised to find:

    a. how little there is in the public domain and
    b. that this is despite the fact that all the leading journals are fairly permissive in this matter (though how well they communicate this fact to authors is open to question).

    Do please send me the link to your other piece. It may come up through my standard search procedures, but they are a bit ‘hit and miss’.

    And good luck with your new project!

    Best wishes

    GP

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s