International Research Association for Talent Development and Excellence (IRATDE)

Information about IRATDE and a brief assessment of its potential is now here.

If you can add any more details or you feel that this assessment is unfair, do please comment below.

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3 thoughts on “International Research Association for Talent Development and Excellence (IRATDE)

  1. Thank you for introducing the IRATDE to your readership!

    *Although there is no charge, full membership is
    *restricted to published scientists: organisations and *practitioners may only be affiliates.
    *This seems at odds with IRATDE’s claim to be ‘committed
    *to building bridges between theory and practice, *particularly in the fields of gifted education,
    *capacity building and organizational development’.

    Honestly, I do not see your point. The IRATDE is one of the few research associations worldwide that grant practioneres a kind of membership. The IRATDE is also one of the few research associations worldwide that explicitly states an obligation to serve the practice and reaches out to practioners. In this respect it sets rather an example for other research associations which mainly live in their ivory tower.

    *The executive committee includes three German
    * representatives and one each from Australia,
    * China, Saudi Arabia.

    Actually, the EC includes only 2 German representatives and one each from Australia, China and Saudi Arabia.

    *The organisation publishes a newsletter ‘ Talent Talks’ *and a research journal ‘Talent Development and Excellence, *both of which are freely available on its website. The *former, managed by an editorial board of two based in Hong *Kong, has so far produced only a single edition, dated *January 2010.

    The newsletter is published twice a year. The next issue is due in July. Join the IRATDE (www.iratde.org/membership) and you will be automatically informed when it is available.

    *It is hard to avoid the conclusion that IRATDE has been *established in direct competition with the World Council *by those who are dissatisfied with its progress.

    The IRATDE is by no means a competition. The fact is that the World Council is simply not a research association (although quite a number of professors and researchers are members and, by the way, I am a member, too). But over the course of the last years the World Council became increasingly nonscientific.

    *As yet, its membership is unlikely to be strong enough to *threaten the Council’s viability, but that may change.

    As already mentioned, the IRATDE regards itself not as a competitor to the World Council. It is a research association that has also the objective to share the latest research with anyone who might be interested.
    Presently the IRATDE has members from 48 countries (by the way, this is more than the World Council or any organization in the field of gifted education).

    Kind regards,
    Albert Ziegler
    (Secretary General of the IRATDE)

  2. Thanks for your detailed response and sorry it has taken me so long to respond in turn.

    I would be very happy to exemplify how IRATDE is actively building bridges between theory and practice. At first sight, your membership policy does not seem to facilitate the necessary interaction between researchers and practitioners, but I am quite ready to be persuaded otherwise.

    Strictly speaking I should have described the committee in your terms and said that the assistant to the committee is also based in Germany. It does seem as though there is a strong German foundation to the organisation, though membership across 48 countries is very impressive.

    I am interested in your perception that the World Council has become increasingly non-scientific. That may be true but, speaking as an ex policy-maker, it does continue to feel very much dominated by the research community.

    You may have seen my subsequent blog posts about the economics of gifted education which draw on the research by Rindermann et al that you published in your inaugural journal. It would be very interesting to know whether IRATDE has any information about the way in which this article has been received and whether there are any plans to follow up the initial research?

    Thanks

    GP

  3. Hi Tim,

    >I would be very happy to exemplify how IRATDE
    >is actively building bridges between theory and
    >practice.

    There are basically for ways:

    1 We accept practitioners as associate members (I guess less than 5% of research associations allow for that).

    2 We invite pratitioners to present best-practice-examples at our conferences.

    3 We try to communicate our findings to the public.

    4 We actively promote research that is relevant for the practice. For example, the Rinderman manuscript you mentioned was an invited contribution.

    If you have more suggestions to connect research and gifted ed better, we are more than happy to learn from you 🙂

    >I am interested in your perception that the World
    >Council has become increasingly non-scientific.
    >That may be true but, speaking as an ex policy-maker, >it does continue to feel very much dominated by the >research community.

    For example, in the Executive Committee of the World Council is — as far as I know — no member with more than 3-4 published papers in scientific journals with a peer review. Thus, speaking from the point of view of a researcher, I think that policy-makers, practitioners, and scientists are equally well represented in the World Council.

    >Rinderman article:

    The number of downloads is around 1200. In addition I have seen the manuscript quite often quoted, but I do not have any impact estimations.

    Best regards,
    Albert

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